Wolf Tumblrclocked

nearuncertainty:

wolfoverclocked:

salamandersamba:

owlturdcomix:

You have to really want to.

http://i.imgur.com/8ghzmAn.png

It’s us, you guys!

You need to be playin’ Pathfinder, also having an expert like me around would be advised as well.

Man i tried to put together a group of noobs, and they found it painful just putting together the chars. needless to say, it did not last long.

I usually start with the ol’ question: what would you like to do in the group?  Do you want to fight things with a warrior class?  Heal?  Magic?  Skill user?

Then get specific with like: what type of warrior?  Weapon master?  Holy warrior?  Rager? 

For people more in the know, I generally don’t use such simple language.  Like the first time I got my brother to play, I just told him the races and classes straight up, since he’s a WoW player and Magic the Gathering expert.

The hardest part is getting people new to the game to participate right of the bat and generally requires lots of hand holding and coddling until they’re ready.

salamandersamba:

owlturdcomix:

You have to really want to.

http://i.imgur.com/8ghzmAn.png

It’s us, you guys!

You need to be playin’ Pathfinder, also having an expert like me around would be advised as well.

adventuresofanerd:

literaryfirearms:

corruptionpoints:

syringesin:

THIS IS PRECISELY WHY I DON’T USE ALIGNMENT. WAD THE ALIGNMENTS INTO A BALL AND TOSS THAT SHIT IN THE GARBAGE.
from Gamemasternig by Brian Jamison.

Relevant.

Just because there’s a label for your morality doesn’t mean it can’t change. If anything, changing your character’s alignment entry is a fantastic, mechanical way of showing a strong character change.

In the past, I have had characters start off with a true neutral alignment, and grow into their true alignment as they story progresses. When I did this, I used the Unearthed Arcana rules for prestige paladins (because you couldn’t be LG from the start). It worked out pretty well, and allowed for the characters to really be themselves.  I decided where they were on the scale, if they could cast spells with the good/evil descriptors, and such. It was fun, because they really worked at making choices that impacted the direction they wanted their characters to go. I found in that group only one character had strongly lawful tendencies, while the rest sat near the middle, or skewed towards chaotic. … because it’s fun to blow sheep up.

Alignments are guidelines, now rules (unless the rules require it).  They’re there to help flesh out and define who your character is, but they need to be flexible enough to allow your character to grow.

adventuresofanerd:

literaryfirearms:

corruptionpoints:

syringesin:

THIS IS PRECISELY WHY I DON’T USE ALIGNMENT. WAD THE ALIGNMENTS INTO A BALL AND TOSS THAT SHIT IN THE GARBAGE.

from Gamemasternig by Brian Jamison.

Relevant.

Just because there’s a label for your morality doesn’t mean it can’t change. If anything, changing your character’s alignment entry is a fantastic, mechanical way of showing a strong character change.

In the past, I have had characters start off with a true neutral alignment, and grow into their true alignment as they story progresses. When I did this, I used the Unearthed Arcana rules for prestige paladins (because you couldn’t be LG from the start). It worked out pretty well, and allowed for the characters to really be themselves.  I decided where they were on the scale, if they could cast spells with the good/evil descriptors, and such. It was fun, because they really worked at making choices that impacted the direction they wanted their characters to go. I found in that group only one character had strongly lawful tendencies, while the rest sat near the middle, or skewed towards chaotic. … because it’s fun to blow sheep up.

Alignments are guidelines, now rules (unless the rules require it).  They’re there to help flesh out and define who your character is, but they need to be flexible enough to allow your character to grow.

cute-slutty-baby-bunny:

ihititwithmyaxe:

sadisticdm:

spotmocker:

989fox989:

I am so excited for D&D this Sunday, I can’t even describe it!

Hey I DM on Sunday nights and I can’t wait either! Small world?

What’s with everyone playing on Sundays? *Also a Sunday gamer*

I love me some Sunday D&D! It’s the best day because no one does anything else Sundays.

I used to play on Sunday’s until I started working. I honestly prefer Friday nights.

Me and my friends play on Sunday too.  though we play either Pathfinder or Palladium mostly.

adventuresofanerd:

pinkdicebag:

Reasonable-Actor right here.

True Reasonable.

Reasonable Gamer

adventuresofanerd:

pinkdicebag:

Reasonable-Actor right here.

True Reasonable.

Reasonable Gamer

(Source: lost-carcosa)

jarmaha:

My bag of holding :D #dnd #pathfinder #bag #tabletop

I have that Bag of Holding as well!!
It’s currently filled with RPG books and supplies.

jarmaha:

My bag of holding :D #dnd #pathfinder #bag #tabletop

I have that Bag of Holding as well!!

It’s currently filled with RPG books and supplies.

psuedofolio:

laughingsquid:

Roll20, A Customizable Online Dungeons & Dragons Platform

I might know some interested parties…

Right here!

psuedofolio:

laughingsquid:

Roll20, A Customizable Online Dungeons & Dragons Platform

I might know some interested parties…

Right here!

EVERY.
FREAKING.
BOOK.

EVERY.

FREAKING.

BOOK.

(Source: steempawnk)

D&D Online Alignment Test

Your Character’s Alignment

Based on your answers to the quiz, your character’s most likely alignment is Neutral Good.

Neutral Good

A neutral good character does the best that a good person can do. He is devoted to helping others. He works with kings and magistrates but does not feel beholden to them. The common phrase for neutral good is “true good.” Neutral good is the best alignment you can be because it means doing what is good without bias toward or against order.

—excerpted from the Player’s Handbook, Chapter 6

Keep in mind the alignment suggested by the quiz is just that: a suggestion. It describes your character no better than a 36-question test would describe you. But it’s a good way to start thinking about how your character acts when confronted with issues of alignment.

Now that your character has taken the test, make a note of which questions scored in the opposite direction from your overall alignment. These exceptions can tell some interesting tales about your character Are you a good character with a greedy streak? Are you a lawful character who can’t stand the village elders? Don’t just roleplay your alignment — roleplay your alignment exceptions, too. Few characters perfectly embody their alignment choice.

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/dnd/20001222b

adventuresofanerd:

Welcome to my room! … I call it ‘The Cave of Perpetual Virginity’.

I’ll a picture later, but those book shelves look almost like my RPG bookshelf.  Complete with the miniatures on top of the books.